Thermal City

Thermal City

Thermal City

Thermal City

 

 

Thermal City Gold Mine Trip

One weekend in July 2002 Buddy Davis and I set out for a weekend of Gold panning in North Carolina. Our local club was having a common dig where each person that signs up gets a share of the Gold from the dig. Thermal City Gold Mine is a very interesting place. They have cabins for rent and camp sites, we choose to tent camp along the river that ran through the mine. Besides working the common dig, we also bought a front end loader full of dirt and had them place it in the stream just below our camp site. We planned to use the small high banker that I owned to work the dirt for gold. The high banker doubles as a two 1/2 inch dredge or a high banker. It has a small gas pump that sprays water over the dirt and washes it down the sluice where the gold is trapped along with the black sand. When the black sand starts to back up or the pump runs out of gas, we wash out the sand into a 5-gallon bucket. We then take a break and divide the sand, panning out the gold. Panning is the fun part, you wash the dirt and sand off the top until you have only a small amount in the corner of the pan. Then you swirl the water around in a clockwise motion until the black sand is slowly moved and the gold shines through. That is truly a lovely sight. You continue this motion until the gold is free of the sand, then you take your dry finger and touch the gold. It will stick to the end of your finger until you touch the water in a small bottle. We worked all day Saturday on the common dig and our private dirt pile until dark and retired to our tent. This sure was living, you could hear the stream just below the tent and the summer night was nice and cool in the mountains. We had just dozed off when we heard a train approaching. We had been out all day and had not noticed any trains or tracks. The approaching train got louder and louder until we were sure that it was going to run over our tent. I have heard of this and also have experienced the slow demise of tents in railroad cars. I have always preferred thelectic style of tents, especially when they are coupled with a good ground sheet. This is not a bad idea as the hardwoods tend to give away your position in terms of their signal sounds. We stayed put as the train approached and had no idea that it was going to overturn our tent. The last thing we needed was to have water run into our tent while we were sleeping. We had ok taped up and placed our sleeping bags on the serving track. The train came to a stop and when it did weaucstered the tent and stuffed our bags into the car. The car was a mess with so much equipment and we tried to stuff the car as much as possible, realizing that we had put things in it, ( Despite the fact that we were freezing) and then began the grueling drive back to Sacramento. The return trip through the park was fairly long, 5 hours might have been better considering how many times we stopped to rest. On the way back I became glanceable at the size of the valley and realized that we would be returning in a week or less. While listening to the train horn blow through the valley, I began to becomeperate. The noise of the train was getting louder and louder. I became convinced that it was time to stop the car and sit still until the train went around the hill. I looked out of the window and into the valley below and it was nothing short of a miracle. Our next stop was the Eureka mine. I waited till the toll booth was almost hit and then went UFABET เว็บตรง across the street and used the other entrance. The next thing I know I’m hanging out in front of emerald green and orange mountains. That’s me–just off the cliffs in beautiful southern California.
 

 

 

 
Thermal City